Lithium Deep Cycle Battery

admin 1/26/2022
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A deep cycle battery powering a traffic signal

A deep-cycle battery is a battery designed to be regularly deeply discharged using most of its capacity. The term is traditionally mainly used for lead–acid batteries in the same form factor as automotive batteries; and contrasted with starter or 'cranking' automotive batteries designed to deliver only a small part of their capacity in a short, high-current burst for cranking the engine.

For lead-acid deep-cycle batteries there is an inverse correlation between the depth of discharge (DOD) of the battery and the number of charge and discharge cycles it can perform;[1] with an average 'depth of discharge' of around 50% suggested as the best for storage vs cost.[2]

While the main focus of this article is on traditional lead-acid, newer technologies, such as lithium-ion batteries - already commonplace in smaller sizes[3] - are beginning to become common in this same form factor; although still at a large price premium.[4]

Types of lead-acid deep-cycle battery[edit]

MIGHTY MAX BATTERY ML100-12LI - 12 Volt 100 AH Deep Cycle Lithium Battery (1) Model# ML100-12LI. MIGHTY MAX BATTERY 12-Volt 200 Ah Rechargeable AGM Sealed Lead Acid (SLA) Battery (3) Model# ML4D. MIGHTY MAX BATTERY 12-Volt 7 Ah Sealed Lead Acid (SLA) Rechargeable Battery. TalentCell 2000 Cycles Rechargeable 12V 24Ah 288Wh Lithium Iron Phosphate (LiFePO4) Deep. The stats are impressive, do yourself a favor and research what some say is the pinnacle of deep cycle, lithium ion battery technology. Battle Born says: “Weighing in at a sleek 29 lbs, the 100 amp hour, 12 volt Battle Born Battery dances circles around the competition. The stats are impressive, do yourself a favor and research what some say is the pinnacle of deep cycle, lithium ion battery technology. Battle Born says: “Weighing in at a sleek 29 lbs, the 100 amp hour, 12 volt Battle Born Battery dances circles around the competition. A deep-cycle battery is a battery designed to be regularly deeply discharged using most of its capacity. The term is traditionally mainly used for lead–acid batteries in the same form factor as automotive batteries; and contrasted with starter or 'cranking' automotive batteries designed to deliver only a small part of their capacity in a short, high-current burst for cranking the engine.

The structural difference between deep-cycle and cranking lead-acid batteries is in the lead battery plates. Deep cycle battery plates have thicker active plates, with higher-density active paste material and thicker separators. Alloys used for the plates in a deep cycle battery may contain more antimony than that of starting batteries.[5] The thicker battery plates resist corrosion through extended charge and discharge cycles.

Lithium

Deep-cycle lead-acid batteries generally fall into two distinct categories; flooded (FLA) and valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA), with the VRLA type further subdivided into two types, Absorbed Glass Mat (AGM) and Gel. The reinforcement of absorbed glass mat separators helps to reduce damage caused by spilling and jolting vibrations.[6] Further, flooded deep-cycle batteries can be divided into subcategories of Tubular-plated Opzs or flat plated. The difference generally affects the cycle life and performance of the cell.

Flooded[edit]

The term 'flooded' is used because this type of battery contains a quantity of electrolyte fluid so that the plates are completely submerged. The electrolyte level should be above the tops of the plates which serves as a reservoir to make sure that water loss during charging does not lower the level below the plate tops and cause damage. Flooded batteries will decompose some water from the electrolyte during charging, so regular maintenance of flooded batteries requires inspection of electrolyte level and addition of water. Major modes of failure of deep-cycle batteries are loss of the active material due to shedding of the plates, and corrosion of the internal grid that supports active material. The capacity of a deep cycle battery is usually limited by electrolyte capacity and not by the plate mass, to improve life expectancy.[5]

New technologies[edit]

Although still much more expensive than traditional lead-acid, a wide range of rechargeable battery technologies such as lithium-ion are increasingly attractive for many users.[citation needed]

Applications[edit]

  • Cathodic protection, which might include marine use
  • Other marine use, especially on a sailboat lacking power generation capability, generally smaller vessels
  • Trolling motors for recreational fishing boats
  • Industrial electrically-propelled forklifts and floor sweepers
  • Off-grid energy storage systems for solar power or wind power, especially in small installations for a single building or motorhome
  • Power for instruments or equipment at remote sites
  • Recreational vehicles
  • Traction batteries to propel vehicles, such as golf carts, and other highway electric vehicles
  • Uninterruptible power supply ('UPS'), usually for computers and associated equipment, but also sump pumps
  • Audio equipment, similarly to a UPS but also in certain 'clean power' devices to supply clean DC power isolated from the public electric supply for inversion to AC to maximize audio signal reproduction

Recycling[edit]

According to the Battery Council International ('BCI') -- a lead-acid battery industry trade group -- the vast majority of deep cycle batteries on the market today are lead acid batteries. BCI says lead acid batteries are recycled 98% by volume, 99.5% by weight. According to BCI, the plastic cases, lead plates, sulfuric acid, solder, and other metals are 100% recovered for reuse. BCI says the only part of a battery that is not recyclable is the paper separators that wrap the plates (due to the acid bath the paper sits in, the fiber length is reduced so far that it cannot be rewoven).

BCI says that, industry wide, there is a greater than 98% rate of recovery on all lead acid batteries sold in the United States, resulting in a virtually closed manufacturing cycle.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^http://support.rollsbattery.com/support/solutions/articles/4346-agm-discharge-characteristics
  2. ^'Deep Cycle Battery FAQ'. Windsun.com. Retrieved 2011-07-20.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^For example in smartphones and laptops
  4. ^'Lithium RV Battery System Cost Analysis'. Technomadia.com. Retrieved 7 January 2019.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ abDavid Linden, Thomas B. Reddy (ed). Handbook Of Batteries 3rd Edition. McGraw-Hill, New York, 2002 ISBN0-07-135978-8, pages 25-44 to 23-53
  6. ^Marshall Batteries. 'Are 'Deep Cycle' batteries constructed differently?'. Retrieved 2016-06-07.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. ^'Battery Recycling'. Batterycouncil.org. 2012. Retrieved 2014-10-02.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)

External links[edit]

  • The difference between deep-cycle batteries and regular lead-acid (car) batteries at HowStuffWorks
Retrieved from 'https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Deep-cycle_battery&oldid=1007964948'

What type of battery do I need to run my trolling motor?

Most electric trolling motor will operate with any deep cycle 12-volt marine battery. But for the longest run time and lifespan we recommend lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) batteries. Here’s 5 reasons why:

Lithium Deep Cycle Battery
  1. Dakota Lithium LiFePO4 batteries will provide double to triple the run time. More run time means more fishing time.
  2. Dakota Lithium batteries last longer and will need to be replaced less often. Providing piece of mind and greater lifetime value.
  3. Dakota Lithium weighs 60% less than deep cycle lead acid batteries. Less weight means more maneuverability and speed. And the batteries are easier to carry when you need to charge them.
  4. Dakota’s lithium iron phosphate works down to negative 20 degrees Fahrenheit (-29 Celsius) meaning you can power your boat in the summer and your ice fishing rig in the winter.
  5. You need less batteries when you use a Dakota Lithium. Lithium iron phosphate has a flat voltage curve. That means that the voltage does not drop as you use the battery. You get all the juice down to the last drop. Historically if you power a trolling motor with a deep cycle lead acid battery you would only be able to use half of the capacity of the battery before the voltage is too low to run the motor. With Dakota Lithium you can use all of the power of the battery, meaning that a 100 Ah battery from Dakota Lithium is equal to 200 Ah in lead acid batteries.

SHOP DAKOTA LITHIUM BATTERIES

The Best Battery for Your Trolling Motor is Dakota Lithium

Motor Thrust / Max Amp Draw (A) @ Voltage (V) / Recommended Battery

  • 20 lbs / 20A @ 12V / DL 23 or DL 54
  • 25 lbs / 25A @ 12V / DL 23 or DL 54
  • 30 lb / 30A @ 12V / DL 54 or DL 100
  • 45 lb / 42A @ 12V / DL 54 or DL 100
  • 55 lb / 50A @ 12V / DL 54 or DL 100
  • 70 lb / 42A @ 24V / 24V Single or DL 54 x 2 or DL 100 x 2
  • 80 lb / 56A @ 24V / DL 100 x 2 or DL 170 x 2
  • 101 lb / 46 @ 36V / 36V Single or DL 54 x 3 or DL 100 x 3
  • 112 lb / 52 @ 36V / 36V Single or DL 100 x 3 or DL 170 x 3

How to calculate run time for a trolling motor battery

How long you can run your trolling motor depends on the max amp draw and if your battery is lead acid or Dakota lithium (see above). Also important is how often you run your trolling motor at the max power setting while on the water. Using a lower power setting = more fishing time!

Lithium Deep Cycle Battery Reviews

Step 1: Determine the voltage of your motor. 12V motors are smaller, and more cost effective. They typically requires only one battery. 24V and 36V motors have more thrust and use more power, requiring multiple batteries (directions for how to link batteries in series to create a 24V or 36V battery are here). If cost is top of mind for you then a 12V motor may be a better choice. If power & performance is the most important then a 24V or 36V system may better meet your needs.

Step 2: Determine the amp draw of your motor. Max amp draw of your trolling motor should be less than < the max amp draw of your battery (also called continuous discharge rate). This means that your motor will never ask for more power than your battery is capable of giving at any one time. For many 12V motors the max amp draw is roughly equal to the lbs of thrust. So if you have a 30 lb motor the amp draw is most likely near 30 amps. 24v and 36v motors use less amps per pound of thrust. It is important to confirm the max amp draw with your motor manufacturer.

Step 3: Find a Dakota Lithium battery with a max continuous amp discharge that is greater than what your motor needs. Shop trolling motor batteries options here.

Here’s an example from Minnakota on how many amps their line of trolling motors draw. The larger the lbs of thrust the more power the trolling motor uses.

Please note: this chart is for educational purposes only and is not applicable to all trolling motors. Contact your trolling motor manufacturer for your model’s amp draw and instructions on rigging, including the use of fuses or circuit breakers.

Motor Thrust / Max Amp Draw / Voltage

  • 30 lb / 30A @12V
  • 40 lb, 45 lb / 42A @12V
  • 50 lb, 55 lb / 50A @12V
  • 70 lb / 42A @ 24V
  • 80 lb / 56A @ 24V
  • 101 lb / 46A @ 36V
  • 112 lb / 52A @ 36V

For a all Dakota Lithium batteries the max continuous amp discharge for a 12 volt battery is roughly = to the total amp hours (Ah). For example a Dakota Lithium 23 Ah battery has a max continuous amp discharge of 24 amps. This is enough to power small 12v kayak fishing motors, but would not be enough for motors with more than 25lbs of thrust. For big motors you want a bigger battery. One way to create a larger continuous amp discharge is to wire two batteries in parallel. This will double the capacity (run time) and the max continuous amps. For example two Dakota Lithium 23Ah batteries wired in parallel would have the max continuous amps available to power a trolling motor with up to 45-50 lbs of thrust and a capacity of 46 amp hours (Ah). This is enough power for many kayak fishing and other small boats.

One important note, if you wire two batteries in series it will increase the voltage but not the max continuous amp discharge or the capacity (Ah). This is why most 24V or 36V trolling motors use 50 Ah batteries or larger. 24V and 36V motors have a high amp draw and needs multiple batteries in series to meet the power required. Wiring two smaller, 23Ah batteries in series may work, but you would only be able to use your motor for a short amount of time.

Step 4: Decide on how long you want to run your motor for each day. If you are a fish from dawn to dusk person (aka “full day”) you will want your battery to have double the capacity (Amp hours or Ah) of your motors max draw (for example, if your motor draws 25 amps you may want a 50 Ah battery). If you are a half day or run your trolling motor for just half the day you can use a battery where the capacity (Ah) is equal to your amp draw. For example, if you have a motor that uses 25Ah you might be fine with just one 23Ah battery.

Here’s the math to calculate run time: (Total capacity of the battery ÷ total max amp draw of your motor) × 60 minutes = Run time for your trolling motor at maximum power setting*

* Using a lower power setting will significantly extend total run time. A deep dive on power settings and run time is available here.

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